Weekend Short-Takes: E3 Edition, 6/14/13

Xbox One coming in November for $499

Simon Wu:

Analyst Michael Pachter believed it would be $399 because that was the estimated cost of components, but evidently this was not the case. What happened to consoles being loss leaders Microsoft? You’re supposed to undercharge so we buy three, then recapture that with used games and Gold subscriptions. I believe this is the ultimate sign that Microsoft saw the success of the 360, and misinterpreted it as giving them a mandate to dictate where the market should go.

Max Gruber:

Oh Microsoft. Jumping the gun as usual with the price, expecting us to buy it. So much for being a loss leader, huh? It’s quite ironic that this time, Microsoft is doing what Sony did with the PS3 in terms of pricing, and Sony is doing what Microsoft did for the 360. I wonder if the reason it costs so much is because of the extra services, like the TV broadcasting. Broadcasting shows on TV isn’t cheap, and I bet they’re capitalizing on the price point to levy the price of all the services they have. And considering that the PS4 costs $399, it means that most people will be getting the PS4 first, and then waiting for a price drop for the X1.

Taj Gillani:

I can honestly say I’m not really surprised that the XBO opens at $499. It’s a reasonable price for such a console; it does many things, and is rather innovative in terms of interactivity, with the Kinect being a central design feature. BUT it is just that feature that dooms the XBO. Much like the X360/PS3 war when they first came out, the cheaper console is likely to win. Bundling the Kinect raises the price of the XBO, and thus Sony is able to undercut the XBO price by $100. Sony will rebound for this new generation of consoles, and they’re going to end up with a larger market share (for this generation) and a happier fanbase.

John Fenix:

Call me a bit crazy, but I feel Sony may have set that price that day, just to add the icing onto their own cake. Wild speculation aside, on its own, it's not a bad price for a console, but with its competitor, that's going to hurt it in the short term. It's really going to come down to how people expect to use the console, and for gamers, Microsoft isn't in a good position.

Alex Miller:

The day seemed to be going so well for Microsoft. After absolutely killing it in their press conference and announcing many exclusives and new Xbox Live features, the day seemed won. Then the price showed up. I know that it would be an overreaction to say that this puts Microsoft at a serious overall disadvantage, but it will significantly hamper their ability to match (let alone better) the launch success of the Xbox 360. While the Xbox One seems (relative to the competition) to be a much better console than the Xbox 360 was, that extra hundred dollars will just be too much for some people. While the bundled Kinect will certainly increase usability, I feel that Microsoft has again made things needlessly difficult for themselves. Do I think they will ultimately win this generation? Yes, but that has more to do with the healthy lead the Xbox 360 built and a reluctance for people to change away from an ecosystem they are comfortable and familiar with. However, new gamers come along everyday, and Microsoft cannot hope to succeed if they are content to rest upon their past laurels.

pcworld.com

Microsoft Introduces New Xbox 360, Special Deals for Xbox LIVE Members

Simon Wu:

Microsoft confused me by only making the new 360 half of what it should be. The new one is smaller and lighter, but by how much I don’t know. It was available at retailers on announcement day, except that it wasn’t. I expected something far smaller to present it as more of a set-top box, with the corresponding price drop. In addition, I expected the storage to be increased to handle all the entertainment content that Microsoft wants to push on people. I simply don’t know how this “more of the same” console will get Microsoft the additional 25 million sales they want.

Max Gruber:

It’s an odd decision to redesign the 360, at half price of the Xbox One, especially considering the Xbox One is just around the corner. Why bother creating a new 360 when most people will be getting the Xbox One? It seems like they’re still going to support the 360 long after the X1 launches. We saw that with the PS2, Nintendo Gamecube, and the original Xbox with things like Splinter Cell: Double Agent going on the current-gen consoles and the previous generation of consoles.

John Fenix:

Believe it or not, unlike my colleagues, I believe the 360 is going to have quiet a longer life than expected. Many of the showcase games will be released on both generations, no backwards compatibility means that gamers who wish to continue playing games like Halo 4 will still need it, and, the elephant in the room, the need to not connect online all the time will keep the 360 around a bit longer than people think. Microsoft has said that they plan to support it over the next few years, and we can only hope and see how that turns out.

Alex Miller:

I have to agree with John, but only so far in that the Xbox 360 will continue to shift units. However, I am also disappointed with Microsoft, but not for the same reason that Simon is. Something that I thought was desperately needed for this new version to be a real success was a price drop. Think about it, if they offered the Xbox 360 at even lower prices than they do now they could potentially undercut some of the customers looking to get the PS4 solely because of the price. With the price staying the same, this news is really no news, since I can’t see any real change in the rate at which they will be selling these things. If you were gonna buy a new Xbox 360 you can still do that. If you weren’t, there really isn’t a new reason to do so now unless you are a huge fan of two tone colorization and flatter sides.

winsupersite.com

Xbox One To Get TwitchTV Integration

Simon Wu:

Ustream sided with the PS4, and Twitch chose the One. Twitch has 35 million active users per month, but is solely focused on gaming, while Ustream is a more broadly inclusive network with all kinds of content and 80 million users. I find it intriguing that Sony as the more gaming focused did not opt for the gaming focused streaming site, and the same goes for Microsoft with broad entertainment. Conversely, it may serve as a way for Microsoft to boost the One’s gaming credibility and a future way for Sony to diversify into other channels.

Max Gruber:

This is absolutely huge for people who don’t know how to record from their console. *gingerly raises hand* But, how is it going to affect players’ behaviors with their game experience? We saw a massive influx of new Youtube channels with the CodCasting feature for Black Ops 2, which resulted in your average joe being able to record and commentate on their game like they’ve been doing it for years. Will this happen when they decide to live stream their Call of Duty session or any other game?

John Fenix:

This integration ties very well with the rise of online gaming playthroughs and let's play. It’s nice to see these companies embracing this movement with the integration. Will this mean that it become diluted? Probably, but maybe we will be able to see the same variety of content and games being seen from PC gaming on the console.

kotaku.com

Xbox Live Gold subscribers to get two free games a month

Simon Wu:

This is a token contribution for long time 360 gamers, and not very interesting to those who might be looking at jumping in. Firstly, both groups will be let down by the fact that this program will only run from July 1 to December 31. That’s a total of 12 not so free games, as Taj explains below. Existing users will probably be largely disappointed by the games as being big hits that they’ve finished entirely, as is the case for me with this first batch of AC2 and Halo 3.

Taj Gillani:

Microsoft: “Please don’t leave us, guys. We love you. Please come back. We’ll give you free games! Please? Is anybody out there?”
Despite the now pay-to-play online model for PS4, the console itself has won over many a gamer. I think this is just Microsoft looking for a way to compete. My absolute favorite part of this new plan to release games is that they’re calling them ‘free.’ Last time I checked, the $5 monthly fee that we’ve all been paying forever isn’t ‘free’. I’m pretty sure it’s $5.

Jonathan Tung:

Once again, Microsoft is copying Sony in a desperate attempt to keep subscribers happy with their gold accounts instead of leaving for the PS4. However, since they are offering two games that almost everyone has already owned/played, then it’s quite clear that the company is not only out of touch with their consumer base, but also out of time. Look, if Microsoft wants to succeed, they have to offer more to their consumers than two free games a month; maybe throw in a free year of Netflix, unlimited music streaming, or maybe a premium account upgrade for Skype, and maybe they could still remain relevant to their customers.

Alex Miller:

This is certainly a nice gesture and a nice way to compete with Sony at a time when Microsoft is desperately looking for ways to punch back. However, while it is nice, I feel like this is just meant to be more of a delaying tactic really, keeping current Xbox 360 owners (and more importantly Xbox Live subscribers) from switching away immediately. If this keeps people pacified long enough for Microsoft to take action to make their (admittedly appealing) console more widely appealing. If no such action follows, this won't end up mattering.

kotaku.com

Sony confirms PS4 pre-owned DRM is 'up to third parties'

Simon Wu:

SONY! You were the chosen one! You were supposed to stop 3rd-party DRM tyranny, not leave it in darkness! Ultimately, this is the compromise. I predicted that Sony would either need to go Microsoft’s way or make some sort of concession, or face backlash from publishers in the form of increased Xbox exclusives. Here, at least, Sony has had to cave in but by going second, has been able to tailor the message far better and tone down the... undesirable aspects.

Max Gruber:

Well this is disappointing to say the least. So it would seem that both the X1 and the PS4 will be leaving used-game DRM to the third party devs and publishers, but I do have to side with Simon about how this was necessary for them to keep internal interest between the publishers and them in order to prevent the Xbox One from getting exclusivity on their platform. But, at least Sony has confirmed that we can play used-games while offline without the need to authenticate the disk.

Alex Miller:

This is an aspect of the new consoles that I feel a lot of people over look. While Consoles need to appeal to fans, they also have to appeal to developers. So while people may cry out against Microsoft’s “draconian” DRM policy, developers look on it much more favorably, as we saw with the number of Xbox exclusives. However, while I think Microsoft may have missed the balance somewhat, I feel like Sony has been rather tricksy (to quote Gollum) here. They have presented themselves as the Holy Gaming Crusader against DRM, yet while upon their horse they just coughed and mumbled something which nobody heard. I don’t think this will impact initial sales, so wrapped up in the fervor are its followers, yet the second and third wave may suffer backlash from this. Only time can tell.

PS4 supports used games and features no online check-in

Simon Wu:

I personally think that these off-the-record remarks by an Xbox engineer about the intended purpose of the One’s DRM scheme should be required reading, to put this entire debate into perspective. This is not to say, however, as the engineer opens his discussion with, that Microsoft’s marketing and branding efforts have been stellar. The comment to the press by Don Mattrick that the 360 is an appropriate substitute if you don’t have internet is ludicrous and very poorly communicated. I too am interested in the 2005 Ford Taurus because I can’t afford the full feature set of the 2014 model.

Max Gruber:

Anyone remember JCPenny? Remember all the awesome things they did, like the removal of sales, or the ability to return any piece of clothing as long as it wasn’t severely damaged? They promised that they wouldn’t lie to the customer about anything. You know what happened to them? The practice failed colossally, and they lost around a million and a half customers and an estimated seven-hundred million dollars, and they still haven’t recovered from it. Now, I’m not saying this is going to happen with Sony, but it’s possible. While many will love that the PS4 supports used games and doesn’t require a constant Internet connection to play, or the need to authenticate a new game, it’s possible that they could end up in second place once more.

Taj Gillani:

Simply because the XBO got so much crap for this, I predict the PS4 will receive a very warm welcome from the used-game market. In all honesty, the Xbox’s policy isn’t as big a deal as everyone is making it out to be. It doesn’t prevent you from sharing games, it just adds an extra step in the middle. It’s a nuisance, for sure, but it’s not really a deal-breaker for anyone seriously looking at buying an XBO, and it’s certainly not enough to convince anybody to buy a PS4 instead.

gamespot.com

PS4 owners will need PlayStation Plus subscription for online multiplayer

Simon Wu:

The other cave-in by Sony that I feel was completely glossed over by the public because of the used game and always-online announcements. Even so, Sony still has not taken the ludicrous step that Microsoft has of requiring this subscription to have access to entertainment services, something that continues to puzzle me, given Microsoft’s aggressive push of the One as a set-top box and cable box replacement. Also, the official price is cheaper than XBL Gold, but Gold comes on prepaid cards that can be bought for as little as $30, or half off.

Max Gruber:

There are a lot of people who say that this was the weakest part of the PS4 conference, but I think it has a much larger—and better—impact than most people seem to perceive. If we look back during the PSN hack, the PS3 had zero firewalls and barely any antihacking measures. ZERO FIREWALLS AND LACKLUSTER ANTIHACKING PROTECTION. Anyone could have broken into PSN; an infant could’ve broken into the PlayStation Network. I think this is a very smart move for them to have a monthly subscription to PSN, because it allows them to invest in better security against threats like the PSN hack.

Taj Gillani:

Aw, darn, there goes Sony’s big bragging point. While this may seem like a big issue, the fact that XBox Live costs money seems to have gone completely by the wayside over the past few years, so I imagine this would too. Apparently we’re all willing to ignore the small monthly charges.

Alex Miller:

The other point coughingly muttered by the Holy Crusader. Seriously, like Simon I am amazed that this was hardly touched. Too busy ripping the Xbox One a new one? Well, guess that means we should just leave journalistic integrity by the side. The fact that many people I know who solely have a PS3 over an Xbox 360 because of the free multiplayer means, to me, this is going to be a big hurdle for Sony. Not as big as it could have been had Microsoft taken Ten minutes out of their busy fucking themselves schedule and made it a bit harder for them. Like the DRM, look for this to impact second and third waves of sales.

arstechnica.com

The PS4 Costs $399

Simon Wu:

This is where I really start to question the wisdom of Microsoft’s assertion that the One must be bundled with Kinect. The bar retails for $100. WOW. Does that mean you’re telling me that the console and a controller is also $400? Yes. Microsoft, in being so determined to draw the casual audience with voice commands and gestures to access services, has thus priced them out of buying the device. That, more than anything, is what I take away from the PS4 being “cheaper.”

Max Gruber:

Along with the things mentioned above, this, I think, really sealed the deal for Sony. They locked down on all the controversy with the Xbox One and went ahead and one-upped Microsoft at everything they did. I forgot who said this, but they described it best by saying that Sony stabbed Microsoft in the back, and then twisted the knife every time Sony mentioned a positive feature for the PS4, like the price, the zero requirement to be always-online, no authentication, etc.

Jonathan Tung:

The moment you announce that your console will be $100 less than your competitors, then it’s quite clear that you have pretty much won your crowd into buying your product. Sony was smart to price their console like that, especially as it should give them quite an advantage once it comes out this winter. However, if they want to maintain sales, they also better make sure they also have the games and exclusives to back them up. After all, us gamers need some third party goodness up in here (such as maybe an exclusive title or feature). Still, despite the cheap price, I already know some people are still peeved over how they would also have to pay an extra $5 a month just to play online, but look on the bright side: at least you get some free stuff in the end to try out and keep if you like.

Alex Miller:

This was Sony’s coup de grâce. While the the Xbox One, like the Xbox 360, has more features and usability the PS4, unlike the PS3, is cheaper. And that is huge for people. With a large gaming demographic under the age of 18, money will always be an issue. However, I wonder if we will see the crowds of 12 years olds that currently haunt Xbox Live game chat the world over move to the PS4 this generation. However, semi-kidding aside, the fact that Microsoft was unwilling to take a loss (or at least a bigger lose) on this console in order to establish an initial market share is the ultimate sign to me that they may be over relying on the Xbox 360’s legacy. Well done to Sony for learning from their mistake and once again stealing Microsoft’s thunder this year.

techradar.com

Square Enix reveals Final Fantasy XV and Kingdom Hearts 3 for PS4 and Xbox One

Max Gruber:

I-I-I’m at a loss for words. How do I respond to something like this, especially considering what they revealed after that? But, just today (Tuesday), Square Enix have announced that Final Fantasy XV and Kingdom Hearts III is being released for the PS4 AND the Xbox One. Now, if we look back in 2006, Sony said that Versus XIII was going to be a PlayStation 3 exclusive title. That, and Kingdom Hearts has been, generally, a Sony exclusive title, so this is very interesting that they’ve moved away from exclusivity to being a multiplatform game. I wonder how they’ll treat the PS4 version of XV, since this seems to be a betrayal for those that bought a PS3 for Versus XIII and never got it. But, all in all, I will say this: Square, for all the shit you get, I can proudly say you’re doing the right thing with XV and Kingdom Hearts III.

Taj Gillani:

Hell, it’s about time.
But seriously, these are both big titles, and big Sony titles. The change to multi-platform is a big one, and guarantees amazing sales for both games, but I can imagine Square Enix is going to be visited by several men in Sony jackets with crowbars and Uzis, because they are not going to be happy that two big-name games are no longer exclusive. I genuinely look forward to seeing these games when they release (I’m thinking early 2014 for FFXV, late 2014 for Kingdom Hearts based on development schedules), but I probably won’t end up coming remotely close to buying either.

gottabemobile.com

Overshadowed at E3, Nintendo Plays It As Safe As Possible

Simon Wu:

No hardware improvements at all? No price drop whatsoever? All first-party rehashes? This is such typical Nintendo. On amazon at this very moment, the 32GB Deluxe WiiU SKU is $360. If we want to talk outrageous pricing, forget about the Xbox One for a moment and consider that a now last-gen console is only $40 cheaper than the brand-new PS4. With EA seriously deemphasizing if not outright dropping the WiiU, and longtime WiiU bull Ubisoft deemphasizing until the console sells more, I am utterly dumbfounded by Nintendo’s E3 play. Or lack thereof.

Taj Gillani:

Nintendo's E3 lineup seems to consist of only top-shelf, big-name sequels. I can't fault them there, as it seems to have been working pretty well for them in the past few years, and the titles they revealed all look great. The big problem I see here is that Nintendo crucially lacks new third party games, new IP, and new ideas. They can’t run on old names forever. While this new crop of games may boost sales of the Wii U, developers really need to step it up, because without fresh games the system won't survive in the long run.

John Fenix:

In the chaos of the consoles and controversies, Nintendo did a smart move and offered a small showcase. While impressive and pleased to see some new versions of old franchises, it doesn’t seem enough to possibly bring the boost the Wii U need. Maybe Super Smash Bros. or the new Legend of Zelda promised in the works might be the game changer (well there is Bayonetta 2, but the more I think about it, the more I seem confused) , but it’s a bit shaky right now for Nintendo, so it’s no surprise that they offered a small showcase.

Alex Miller:

Nintendo did the bare minimum, all that was needed, and no more. As we talked about a few weeks ago, Nintendo is desperately relying on a strategy of leading from the front in terms of WiiU development, and until they establish themselves more they will be the only ones developing for it. I think their lack of an E3 press conference, while probably a smart exercise in damage control (staying out of the headlines means no attacks there), is the ultimate answer to the question of whether Nintendo can seriously rally and turn this into a next gen console. And the answer is still very much a no.

gizmodo.fr

Ubisoft hopes you’ll race, dance, assassinate, and play TV in 13 upcoming games

Max Gruber:

Ubisoft’s line up was a lot harder to discern. On one hand, Splinter Cell: Blacklist was interesting, along with The Crew, Watch Dogs, and Tom Clancy’s The Division. But, on the flip side, all the other games like the Rabbids TV series, The Mighty Quest for Epic Loot, and Just Dance 4 really weighed it down for me. Along with the mixed line up of games, the celebrity spokesperson—I forgot what her name was—was really awkward during her time there. Her jokes weren’t as funny as the time she was at E3 last year.

Jonathan Tung:

To say the least, Splinter Cell Blacklist still remains interesting, especially with the return of Spies vs Mercs, a popular multiplayer mode that I considered to be a highlight when I was playing Chaos Theory on my computer back in the day. I would get it, but it looks like I might have fallen for Tom Clancy’s The Division instead. Seeing that it's debut seemed to have taken me by surprise (much like the reveal of Watch_Dogs at last year’s event), I seem to be quite hopeful about this new MMO. However, the way it was initially presented reminded me a lot of Defiance and the Borderlands series, so I can only assume that it would start out with a TON of people playing it only for the population to quickly dwindle after getting distracted with the latest Call of Duty.

Taj Gillani:

Ubisoft, somewhat surprisingly, are the odd ones out at E3. Let me explain: none of the names they dropped at E3 are killer apps. All of their upcoming titles have potential, for sure, but I really can’t see any of them competing with big names from other devs (*hemhem Battlefront, Destiny, Super Smash, GTA V*). The competition for this season is nearly insurmountable, and despite Ubisoft’s best efforts with Watch_Dogs and other games, I can’t see them selling nearly as well as other games. I’m not saying that Ubisoft’s new games are bad (in fact, they look quite good), but I’m just saying that other games look better. Admit it - if you gave almost any gamer $60, they’ll buy GTA V over Watch_Dogs. Only the gamers with serious pocket change are going to be buying much from Ubisoft, and thus they’re going to falter in the upcoming year.

Alex Miller:

With very few exceptions Ubisoft underwhelmed me at this years E3. Their press conference fluctuated between incredibly boring to mildly interesting with three or four legitimately good parts. I’m definitely intrigued by the The Division and cannot wait to hear more on that, same goes for The Stick of Truth and Watch_Dogs. Trials will be good as always and Splinter Cell has potential. However, what I thought was truly interesting was The Crew’s open world USA. While it is obviously not full scale it is still interesting to see something that ambitious. Hopefully some of that ambition spreads into a few of their other, less than boundary pushing titles.

joystiq.com

EA Unveils Xbox One, PS4 Games at E3

Simon Wu:

The previous console generation was marked by games powered by a whole slew of engines, and it’s good to see EA consolidate it down to two, each aimed at a specific purpose. Ignite for sports, and Frostbite for the rest. This reduces development costs and increases interoperability. However, the downside is that games start looking more uniform, and the possibility of a game being defined by a distinct graphical style is no longer possible. Rather, then, it must be the experience and narrative that make the game a success or failure.

Max Gruber:

Not a lot of interesting new titles shown off at EA’s press conference. Besides the new Titanfall and Battlefront game (which I know Simon has a permanent erection for), there wasn’t really anything new from them. The new Titanfall game looks interesting, with some unique concepts like the wall-running, but it just seems like a futuristic version of Call of Duty with mechs, which isn’t painting it in the best light. And all we know about Battlefront is that it’s being developed by the newly formed DICE studio that’s working on Star Wars titles, and the fact that Simon can’t keep his mouth shut about it!

Taj Gillani:

EA’s theme for E3 this year seems to be something along the lines of ‘bigger and better.’ Only one of their big announcements is new (Titanfall), while everything else tacks on to an older series, with major updates. The new engines should bring these old worlds to life, and if EA does it right with Battlefront and Mirror’s Edge 2 (which, despite the number, is a prequel), then they will have plenty of money to go nuts developing new IP over the next few years, and hopefully bring angry gamers back to the company after their PR fiascos this year. I must disagree with Simon though - I think EA will operate on more than 2 engines, because both Ignite and Frostbite seem like human modelling tools, and I don’t think either will be used for Need For Speed.

Jonathan Tung:

Not much could be said about the start of EA’s press conference, although I did get a nice chuckle out of the awkward Peggle 2 announcement. NFS Rivals appears to play exactly like Hot Pursuit, a NFS title that came out three years ago, so that is automatically a must-buy for me. As for the new Battlefield 4, I'm still a little peeved that DICE has jumped ship to Microsoft in order to deliver a time-exclusive DLC pack to Xbox One players, especially since it feels more like a betrayal after delivering time-exclusive DLC to PS3 players last year with Battlefield 3. However, Battlefield 4 looks more like a full-fledged expansion to BF3, so I’m gonna be skipping over this one this year.

heavy.com

E3 2013: Bethesda impresses with Evil Within, Wolfenstein, ESO

Simon Wu:

The wait for Fallout 4 continues. Instead, this E3 was all about Bethesda really flexing its publishing muscle, as it is personally not developing any one of these three titles. It’s betting on an MMO that will somehow survive the wasteland of WoW victims, a game from the creator of Resident Evil, and what appears to be another reboot for one of video games’ most storied and classic franchises. Sounds like a ragtag band of misfits, but I have no indications to prove to me that it will be a failure.

Alex Miller:

This was to be expected. With Skyrim just wrapped up this year, it will be another year or two before they are ready to announce their next project, let alone show anything off it. Good to keep their name in the press but I wasn’t expecting much this year.

gamefront.com

Activision confirms E3 line-up, Skylanders next-gen

Simon Wu:

Did you know that in Ghosts you will have an impeccably modeled dog that you will be emotionally attached to? I’m not sure why the devs have made this an almost creepy point through repetition, but Dog Ops is a bit too far out there, and there have been games in which you have a dog companion before. (read: Fallout 3/New Vegas, Fable) However, the graphics are underwhelming, a persistent complaint with CoD, and a console jump still has yet to rectify that. Contrast the CoD dog with the wolves from Witcher 3. The difference is incredible. That CoD is still top dog has more to do with Battlefield’s failures than its successes.

Taj Gillani:

In some ways, I think Activision’s partnership with Bungie was a terrible idea. Bungie teased Destiny way back in 2009, and since then everything I’ve seen from the game has been absolutely amazing. Right up until 2 days ago, when I saw gameplay. It looks like a pretty bland shooter, to be honest, severely lacking in variety and new gameplay mechanisms, and I can’t help but wonder if that was Activision’s influence. I’ll still take a serious look at the game when it’s released, and I hope that the environments more than make up for gameplay in the end. On the other hand, Ghosts looks like Call of Duty might actually be back on track, with the first actual plot since World at War and the best gameplay since MW2. I sincerely hope that Ghosts bucks their recent trend of generic brown FPSs, and I can’t help but wonder if Bungie rubbed off on them a little bit.

Max Gruber:

I think Destiny is a lot better than what Taj wrote. I think they were just selective with their presentation, choosing what would be shown off at the presentation and what to leave out of it. The majority of the presentation was in the perspective of the Warlock, who was only using the Ghost power and the Biotic-like power. Given what we know about Destiny already, it would seem to be a much deeper RPS than most FPS’ out right now, seeing as this is set in a persistent, open-world environment—compared to the standard linear corridors or the guided exploration fare we’ve come to expect. I’m still excited about Destiny, and I can’t wait to see more of it.

stickskills.com

Scumbagb3n's picture

This may sound stupid but unless Sony alters the thumb sticks/ shitty triggers on their controllers I might just stick with Microsoft's tighter and more comfortable controller. Although i find myself gravitating towards the PS4 for raw power and the nice looking new titles.

Solifluktion's picture

Looking forward to Battlefront.

Whiplash's picture

I'm still recovering from the news Square Enix revealed during E3. Versus XIII rebranded as XV? Kingdom Hearts III? Lightning Returns' first gameplay footage? Holy rarely comes out of my mouth. Shit also barely gets mentioned. But, the truth is, HOLY SHIT. If there's a way to send the ball out of the ballpark to send a message, I think Square hit the ball from Japan all the way around the world and back at their feet.

I wasn't really all that surprised that Versus was rebranded as XV, since they were teasing the living crap out of it in the months before E3, like when they revealed that there would be a cologne called Noctis eau de toilette, and when Tetsuya Nomura said that the announcement was going to be a "warm Spring"; E3 takes place in the Spring season.

As for Kingdom Hearts III, the thing about that reveal was: we weren't expecting it. We knew it was coming, but we didn't know when they would announce it.

I am so stoked for this year, especially when they—or, rather, if they—give a release date for XV. I mean, I'm physically shoving my money at the screen, and nothing's happening.

disgruntledavians's picture

Well now a ton of this is invalidated, but I agree with Simon that the Xbox slimmer was a big disappointment. It should have been far smaller and far cheaper, and there had to be a bump in storage size for both. That is absolutely inexcusable to keep it at 4 GB. It had to be at least 64, and we should have seen them catch up to the PS3 with 500GB, or even 320GB.

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